Tag Archives: Video

Seconds

Click here if you can’t see the video below.

A Question

Click here if you can’t see the video below.

Shadow Scent

Click here if you can’t see the video below.

#Light was the prompt for this holiday sketch task. I was at work with mum when I Noticed some funky shadows on the roof of the patio, and their reflection on the tiles below. I’ve repeated the reflection scene at the end again to reiterate what’s going on in the first scene. I like the pacing I achiever through the edits I made. Once again used a single separate soundtrack, to make the clip smoother overall.

Vietnam Motorbike Adventure Panorama

Click here if you can’t see the video below. Taken while on a motorbike tour with my dad today, I decided to try a which 360• shot of the view. Sorry about the wind noise, I turned it down a little.

Purple Purple Everywhere!

Click here if you can’t see the video below.

Purple Purple Everywhere! from Zoe MacLean on Vimeo.

Prompted by #purple if you couldn’t tell already, this is my second holiday #SketchTask challenge video. I am surrounded by a lot of purple in my life, it is one of my favourite colours after all, so I decided to film all the bits of purple I noticed one day this week when I went with mum to work. I used one of my favourite styles of filming which is a close up unfocused object slowly becoming clearer. The atmos track I recorded separately to make the clip easier to watch, as the individual atmos track clashed quite noticeably.

Just A Tiny Detail

Click here if you can’t view the video below.

Just a tiny little detail from Zoe MacLean on Vimeo.

A holiday #SketchTask challenge video. The prompt was “A tiny detail” and I’m being sarcastic through the medium of video here. This was taken at Bà Nà Hill Fantasy Park, which is an indoor playroom slash theme park at the top of a mountain in Vietnam and I happened to look up at lunchtime and notice this door in the roof that was kind of inaccessible. Just a tiny detail really. Missing a whole staircase and all!

Holiday Blogging

Hey! Heeeeeey! HEY! Are you still there? Or have you migrated for the holidays also? My student feed has died off in the last few days, everybody is breathing a sigh of relief. No more blogging until next semester now, right? Wrong.

Why? Well why not?

Why not keep blogging over the break? Why not see what connections we can make between real life and what we’re learning in this degree? Why not keep up with the creative practices we’ve learnt this semester?

One creative practice I want to keep up over the holidays is that of the sketch tasks. I really enjoyed creating the sketch videos for Integrated Media 1 and I wanted to keep doing them through the semester and instead got bogged down with course work and I didn’t make time to fit in any kind of sketch work. Now that I’ve got a bit more time up my sleeve, I want to start making sketch videos again.

So I’m going to take a bit of inspiration from IM1 and a bit of inspiration from Fat Mum Slim who runs a very popular photo-a-day challenge through her blog and across different social media platforms (more here).

However, I think a video a day over the holidays is a bit too much, so I’m going to run with a different format of three videos a week. You can shoot and upload them whenever you want, all in one go or spread out across the week. I’m going to be uploading mine to Vimeo and cross-posting to Twitter and my blog. You can join in by uploading to Vimeo, Vine or Youtube and posting on Twitter with the hashtag #SketchTask. I’ll be doing a round-up post on here at the end of every week with some of the videos that I really liked, so make sure to tag your sketch tasks so that I don’t miss them!

So the aim of this game is to take the prompt and use it to create a video. You can be as literal or metaphorical as you like, but I’m going to highly encourage creative thinking outside the box. For example, instead of filming something to represent “odour” in week one, why not try and film like odour? How would odour see things? Another thing that’s highly encouraged is pushing yourself and your boundaries. If you’ve never tried a particular technique or method before, use these sketch videos to give it a go! Then, reflect on how it went.

Here are the prompts for the next few weeks over the holidays:

Week 1: 10-16 June

1. Odour
2. Purple
3. A tiny detail

Week 2: 17-23 June

1. Light
2. Hands
3. Something beginning with Q

Week 3: 24-30 June

1. Poetry
2. In the middle
3. The sky

Week 4: 1-7 July

1. Evening
2. Still life
3. Loud

Week 5: 8-14 July

1. Mail
2. Man made
3. Freedom

Week 6: 15-21 July

1. Looking back
2. The big picture
3. Nothingness

Semester two starts on Monday 22 July and if this challenge gets enough of a response and you guys want to continue through the semester, I’ll pop a new list up for those weeks too.

Six weeks of filming more sketch tasks to keep my creative muscles strong… will you join me?

Titles! They’re important too, remember?

My RSS reader was filled on Thursday and Friday with such exciting headlines as:
– K-film Individual Task
– IM- Assessment 1 – K-film
– Integrated Media K-film Explanation
– IM Assessment #1- Korsakow Film
– Korsakow film (with or without an ! at the end)
etc.

Haven’t we explored how useful it can be to give a title to your work guys? I remember an exercise I did in my first year of my teaching course where we had a hypothetical child in a hot air balloon and ten things they carried with them. We had to choose what to drop out of the balloon to let it rise high enough to avoid a hypothetical mountain. I don’t remember the whole list but it included food, love, water, shelter, a name etc. As first year students, the name was one of the first things we allocated to drop, but afterwards our tutor explained that experienced teachers always left the name in as long as they can, because a name is so important to a child’s sense of self.

Our projects may not be sentient (or, as Adrian would suggest, they may be) but that doesn’t mean that naming them isn’t important to their sense of identity.

Just some food for thought.

 

Mideatheire

Mideatheire is my first Korsakow project for Integrated Media 1.

I started this project by making an index card for each of my sketch tasks with the title of the task and the number of each task on it. Then I played around with different ways of sorting and connecting these tasks to each other. My first attempt at making connections sorted the films into four categories; movement, story, experiment, and short cuts. Then I linked the videos within each category and made links between the categories. I tested this as a draft Korsakow project but what I found was that I would get suck in category loops which was rather boring and there were a few videos that just kept coming up over and over (despite my limits on the links) which made the choices dull as well.

So I decided to think about it differently. I decided to think of this project like a poem. On each of my index cards, I wrote one word that described each task and linked it to a few other tasks. Then I wrote the numbers of the tasks I wanted it to link to. Some tasks linked to only three others, some linked to six or seven. My final step was to write the text that would make these links clear to the viewer of my final project. Considering the task that was to be shown, the tasks it would link to and the keyword I’d already identified, I wrote a few lines of prose on the back of each index card.

Now the project was coming together. I changed my draft project to use the new links I’d made and tested how it flowed when watched. When I was happy with that, I then put all my text links into one document so that I could see the outline of the project more clearly. That’s when I realised my subconscious self probably wants to commit suicide. Have a look at all the text as a sort of singular poem and make up your own mind…

With this slightly macabre overarching theme, I decided that I needed to make my Korsakow template reflect this bleak outlook as well, so I mixed greys and made all my thumbnails monochrome which achieved this reflection quite nicely. I debated making all the videos play in black and white as well, but not only would that take me way too much time to coordinate, I felt that the project overall needed a bit of lightness in it, and leaving the playing videos in colour made them seem more lively.  I used the template with the three thumbnails on the bottom and have placed the text in the middle because I want each element to be noticed in this order. First the video, notice what’s happening in each task, what’s the important part of it, and what speaks to the viewer? Second the text, reiterating something in the main video and providing a link to the thumbnails (and their videos) below. Third the thumbnails, notice in what ways they are the same, in what ways they are different and what links can be made between them and to the video and text above.

I’ll talk a little more about the text I have used to link the entire project together. Poetry occurred to me rather early on in the semester as a good way to link videos in a non-linear narrative because the lines of poems (especially the kind I often write) do not have to be told in a particular order for the overall message to make sense. And because I write poetry often, I knew it would be easy enough for me to come up with lines to use with this project. I didn’t expect the lines I wrote for the second draft of this project to be so perfectly able to link the first time round. But as it turns out, my subconscious is not only a fairly depressing place to be, but it’s also pretty ‘together’ so to speak, so the lines linked well right from the beginning. I did of course tweak them once I saw how they actually fitted with the videos, but it was easy to keep the theme of each line in tact.

I was wary of how I would be able to define my Korsakow project as ‘successful’ or not, what are the criteria of a successful project as compared to one that is not? For me the criteria was two main things; first, is the project something that I would enjoy and engage in as a viewer, and second, is the project something that I will be proud of telling people that I made? With Mideatheire, the answer is yes to both. My first draft of the project did not keep me engaged at all (even with the motivation of being the creator) and I was worried that I would create something that even I didn’t want to watch. However once I discovered my overarching theme, the project became inherently interesting and I wanted to test the connections and see what meaning I could make from them. I have shown versions of my second draft to my partner, a neighbour and a work colleague already and I can’t wait to share my final project with family, my social networks as well of course as my peers and teachers in Integrated Media.

The most important thing I’ve learnt in creating Mideatheire would be the importance of testing, testing, testing! In each draft I found something that wasn’t quite right, something that I could improve, change or delete entirely. Then once I’d made the change, it was important to test it again to see if it worked. The first time I thought I had fully finished my project I tested the export and found a missing thumbnail! That was a time costly mistake made only because I hadn’t properly tested my final draft export before considering it done. Testing also allowed me to constantly see the connections between my videos and discover the many, many ways they could link up, giving me a broader understanding of how other might view my work.

Riding Home

Again, I tried to keep this one in the same style as the other two so they could be viewed as a series. What I really like about this video is the darkness, I think it highlights only the most important visual elements needed to make the context and make the message understandable.

This video has less clips and each one goes for longer compared to the first two. this is partly because I didn’t want to hand around outside work for too long filming bits and pieces in the darkness (safety first!) and partly because I didn’t want it to feel as rushed. I can rush to work, and I can rush through my break to get everything done, but I rarely rush home. I take my time even though I love being home and coming home, there’s never such a sense of urgency to get here as there is when I’m travelling to work.